Our Story

The best Australia is a diverse and inclusive Australia, free from racism.
E-RACED was created to tackle this issue of racism head on by sharing stories and building connection between people of diverse multi-cultural backgrounds.

We do not have a political agenda; however, it is quite evident that the majority of schools in Australia do not have programs such as ours. We focus on issues of refugees and migrants living in Australia and bringing change to the education system across Australia.

We train young migrants and refugees to not only share stories and experiences but also share our cultures, music, games, dance, fashion, and ambitions with our fellow young Australians.

We believe that better understanding is good for anyone and everyone, and the best way to achieve it is through the sharing of stories.

That’s why our motto is ‘Erasing racism, one story at a time’.

 
 
Prudence.jpg

Why E-RACED?

"I was inspired to start E-RACED after experiencing first hand the effects of racism in this country and the power of sharing my story to completely change people’s attitudes. Never underestimate the power of one-on-one interactions and sharing stories to change the world.”

- Prudence Melom

 

Our Impact

E-RACED harnesses the power of narrative to inform and engage by using a team of story tellers who share their personal experiences as refugees or migrants with students at schools across Australia.

Our impact works in two ways;

  1. We train young migrants and refugees to share their stories enabling them to be a part of the fight against racism in Australia, provide a face to an often faceless stereotype, connect with their broader community and feel empowered to know that they can become anything they can dream of being.

  2. We enable students to meet people from other cultures and countries. Hearing these stories enables greater comprehension of another’s experiences and encourages the development of empathy.  Positive direct contact and descriptions of personal experiences challenge preconceptions and conversations enable the identification of similarities as well as differences.  Questions provide opportunities for connection and engagement.  Students are able to review their own attitudes and expectations in the light of newfound experiences and knowledge. 

Storytelling is powerful.  It allows students to walk in the shoes of another human being, and do it from the safety of their high school. It crosses cultural barriers, and allows us to share and celebrate difference and similarities.  And it humanities immigrants and refugees in the eyes of the audience. Next time they hear a story about refugees, they can picture someone real, with a human face and a human voice, and a human heart.    As Michelle Obama once said, it’s hard to hate up close.No one is born a racist.  Racism is the result of learned attitudes and behaviours that go unchallenged, and a fear of the unknown.  But it can be erased, one story at a time.

Recognition

We feel extremely lucky to have been recognised for the work we’re doing by our peers. Recent recognition includes;

2018 Finalist for the Human Rights Award (Racism it stops with me)

2017 Winner of the FYA Local Legends Award